Review: by Kilian Pure Oud — 4.0 points

Admittedly, I am hesitant to try any oud perfumes. This is because the choices can be overwhelming, and when bombarded with a myriad of oud variations, it is difficult to pick one. I also find that in most perfumes the note has a particularly irksome quality reminiscent of a medicinal plaster. Even the only one that I consider deserving a try and find it pleasant enough, that is 1001 Ouds (Annick Goutal, 2015), that quality persists, almost as an inherent, ineliminable character of oud. So, I have grown weary of oud almost to the point of aversion.

But that might just change with Pure Oud (by Kilian, 2009).

The name itself does little to offer any promises, but give it time and let it unfold on your skin, and you will be rewarded with probably the best oud interpretation out there. Unlike most other ouds I have tried, Pure Oud, despite featuring such a rich, dense material, is unfathomably radiant. This familiar surprise, if you will pardon the oxymoron, is invariably unique to the style of perfumer Calice Becker who crafted it. She is adept at rendering shimmering compositions, and Pure Oud is one such fine specimen.

pureoud

Whilst it initially seems monolithic, the composition comes to life as the facets readily reveal themselves. Wet civet and dry tobacco are the first juxtaposition. Then, it becomes drier and smoky with guaiac wood. Saffron and musky violet suggest the nuance of leather. Far from being a dull woody accord, which is what I find in most oud perfumes, the interplay of facets is what makes Pure Oud dynamic and interesting.

Although employing shades and accents to polish the accord might seem like an obvious trick, the balance with which they are executed is no mean feat. Here, the sum clearly is round and mellow, and more importantly, the discordant note of medicinal plaster found in most ouds is absent.

A harmonious dark wood blend that continues to mesmerise with its lambency, Pure Oud more than deserves to be tested on skin. And in so doing, the richness of animalic woods will continue to hypnotise all day long.

Source: bykiliran.fr

Review: Tom Ford Vert des Bois — 4.0 points

The name Vert des Bois (Tom Ford, 2016) implies that this perfume is about green and woody notes. And it is: when I smell Vert des Bois, I think of green chypres from the 1970s. Those raunchy green-woody compositions such as Aliage (Estée Lauder, 1972), Private Collection (Estée Lauder, 1973), and Jean-Louis Scherrer (1979) come to mind.  As often is the case for Tom Ford fragrances, they are inspired by perfumery’s classics. But Vert des Bois is far removed from just another all-too-familiar knock-off.

olive

Instead a whiff of Vert des Bois reminds me of the summer trip from Madrid to Seville by train. I smell green olive, sweet thyme, and a sharp resinous fir from the outset. Its aromatic green accord, rounded by a plummy note, conjures the pastoral landscape. A peppery accent brings in the attribute of the mid-day heat in an Iberian summer. And even before the fragrance reveals its woody counterpoint, I can vividly recall the scorched land along route, dotted with venerable olive trees.

And when the dramatic woods do unfurl, they reveal themselves nineteen to the dozen. Leather. Oakmoss. Balsams. All at once. These are inextricably intertwined with a patchouli trail. The dry down some hours into wearing Vert des Bois retains this gripping character, but has become slightly warmer, as sweet tonka bean and musk mellow the rough-hewn woods. The result is nothing short of excitement, from top to bottom.

Whilst it does recall the heavy-hitter chypres from the seventies, Vert des Bois does not feel at all like a mere knock-off of the classics. What sets it apart is the accents. Plum, pepper, thyme, and pine needles make for a twist in the green accord, and when paired with a strong woody accord, one gets an interesting vantage point of a classical green chypre. Having said that, those who enjoy the stark contrast and drama of this genre will relish Vert des Bois and its olive groves and sun-scorched earth.

Source: GetYourGuide.co.uk